Bermuda

As a child, Bermuda was synonymous with the legendary Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil’s Triangle, a place somewhere in the North Atlantic Ocean where planes and ships were reported to have disappeared under mysterious circumstances.  Even though this myth has been dismissed by the experts, it is still ever present in my mind.

Bermuda is in fact an archipelago consisting of over 150 islands with the most significant being connected by bridges, making it appear as one landmass.  You can literally run from one part of Bermuda to the other in just over 8 hours depending on your level of fitness.  Or if you prefer, you can simply drive around at your leisure in less than a day.  But what it lacks in size, it certainly makes up for in beauty.

It is located out in the middle of what seems like nowhere, approximately 1000 km to the west-northwest of North Carolina.  Even though I live on an island myself, it’s still kind of scary living so far away from any other landmass, considering the increasing number of hurricanes recorded annually off the east coast of the US.  But in essence Bermuda, even though it has experienced the wrath of hurricanes over the decades, receives some protection from a coral reef, and its position at the north of the hurricane Alley limits the direction and severity of approaching storms.  As safe a place to be I imagine, as any of the other Caribbean islands.

Bermuda remains one of the British Overseas Territories. With a population of just over 71,000, its inhabitants reflect its rich history of slavery, colonisation and migration with descendants from Africa, Britain, America, Portugal and the mixtures in between.  The buildings whether commercial or residential share a similar paint pallet all with white roofs, giving it a feeling of unity and purpose.  A very warm and welcoming people greet you and you immediately slip into the vacation-I’m-gonna-have-a-great-time mode. With an ocean view at your every turn, you remain calm, relaxed and always with a smile on your face.

We were fortunate to spend our time with some long-time friends or ‘locals’ as you would say, affording us the privilege of visiting every nook and cranny of this wonderful island by land and sea.  From St. Georges at one end to the Royal Naval Dockyard at the other end of the island and all the beautiful beaches, hilltop views, walking trails and restaurants in between.

Thanks to our very generous and gracious hosts, I’d say a time very well spent.

4 thoughts on “Bermuda

  1. Now I am officially jealous! Here I am in Toowoomba, the last two winter days grey and drizzly and a maximum ambient temp of 8.9 C. Thanks for bringing a little sunshine and warmth to this very cold Island boy 🙂

    Like

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